Keep your osteoarthritis (OA) pain relief going – When should you consider re-treatment with EUFLEXXA?

SO, HOW CAN YOU TELL WHETHER EUFLEXXA IS WORKING?

Your knee will tell you. If you have received EUFLEXXA for osteoarthritis (OA) knee pain and you feel relief from pain and other symptoms after a few weeks, that’s great. If you keep on feeling relief over the next few months, that’s even better. The important thing is to recognize whether your relief is lasting. When you recognize lasting relief, that’s a great time to follow up with your doctor and ask about re-treatment 6 months after your first 3-injection course of EUFLEXXA.

Maybe you’re having more good days than bad ones now, and maybe you’re able to walk farther, climb more stairs, or ride your bike for longer. Those are your general observations. Since you and your doctor will want to evaluate your condition based on specifics, you will find some ways to track them here.

HOW MUCH IMPROVEMENT DID PATIENTS EXPERIENCE IN THEIR KNEE PAIN DURING CLINICAL STUDIES WITH EUFLEXXA?

You should know what level of improvement to expect from EUFLEXXA so you have something to compare with your own changes. Keep in mind that every person is unique, so the amount and duration of pain relief and improvement in knee function you experience may be different from what other people experience. To give you a sense of what you might expect with EUFLEXXA therapy, here are the main results from the key clinical studies.

RESULTS FROM THE 12-WEEK STUDY SHOWED1,2,*

  • Comparing patients’ overall knee pain before treatment with overall knee pain after 12 weeks, both EUFLEXXA and another HA provided similar improvement in pain reduction:
    • With EUFLEXXA, overall knee pain improved by an average of 62%
    • With the other HA, overall knee pain improved by an average of 55%

The bar graph shows improvement (reduction in pain score) for each therapy2,3,*:

  • Patients who received EUFLEXXA saw their pain score go from 49.2 before their injections down to 18.7 twelve weeks after the first injection
  • Patients who received another HA saw their pain score go from 51.9 before the injections down to 23.2 twelve weeks after the first injection

The most common adverse events related to EUFLEXXA injections were joint pain, back pain, limb pain, muscle pain, and joint swelling2

In the 12-week study, side effects caused by EUFLEXXA were joint pain (11/160), increase in blood pressure (3/160), joint swelling (3/160), feeling of sickness (3/160), tingling (2/160), back pain (1/160), nausea (1/160), skin irritation (1/160), and tenderness in study knee (1/160).

MORE PATIENTS SAID THEY WERE VERY SATISFIED WITH EUFLEXXA3,* 

  • Both EUFLEXXA and the other HA satisfied a similar number of patients at the end of the 12-week study
  • With EUFLEXXA, MORE patients said they were VERY satisfied

THE PRIMARY ENDPOINT FROM THE 26-WEEK STUDY SHOWED EUFLEXXA WAS ABLE TO

  • Help people with knee pain get lasting pain relief for up to 6 months1,3,*
  • EUFLEXXA provided up to 6 months of pain relief for people with OA of the knee and provided noticeably better relief compared with salt water injections1,3,*

A CONTINUATION OF THE STUDY SHOWED THAT A REPEAT TREATMENT WITH EUFLEXXA WAS SAFE FOR AN ADDITIONAL 26 WEEKS1,3,4,*,†

—With an additional 3-injection course of EUFLEXXA given after 6 months, no patients experienced severe swelling caused by fluid buildup in the joint during the 1 year studied

*Individual results may vary.

All 516 patients who completed the 26-week FLEXX Trial were offered treatment with EUFLEXXA 26 weeks after their first treatment. For those patients who received a series of 3 salt water injections in the FLEXX Trial, this was their first 3-injection treatment with EUFLEXXA. For those who had previously received EUFLEXXA in the FLEXX Trial, this was a repeated series of 3 injections.4

KEEP THE RELIEF GOING 

If you’ve determined that EUFLEXXA is working well for you, after 3 weeks, 6 weeks, or even 12 weeks, be proactive. Make sure your doctor knows how you’re feeling. You can print and show your doctor your symptom and activity trackers from the My EUFLEXXA app, you can share a symptom diary, or you can just tell your doctor that you think EUFLEXXA is working.

The earliest date for a second course of EUFLEXXA therapy is 6 months after your previous course of therapy. So, if you want to keep the momentum going, ask your doctor whether you should schedule re-treatment, and find out your insurance coverage for re-treatment.

HOW LONG SHOULD I EXPECT PAIN RELIEF TO LAST?

Relief can last as long as 6 months,1,3 but every person is different. We suggest that you preschedule a follow-up appointment with your doctor for 3 months after your first course of EUFLEXXA injections to review your condition with your doctor.

WHEN SHOULD I SCHEDULE MY NEXT EUFLEXXA RE-TREATMENT?

As your partner in OA pain relief, we know how important it is to help you maintain your comfort. Once you start feeling better, it’s easy to go back to your life and forget about treatment, but long-lasting relief sometimes needs a little planning. That’s why we recommend tracking your progress, seeing your doctor for a 3-month follow-up visit, and requesting a re-treatment course of EUFLEXXA if it’s working for you.

References: 1. EUFLEXXA [package insert]. Parsippany, NJ: Ferring Pharmaceuticals Inc. 2. Kirchner M, Marshall D. A doubl-blind randomized controlled trial comparing alternate forms of high molecular weight hyaluronan for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee. Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2006;14(2):154-162. 3. Altman RD, Rosen JE, Bloch DA, Hatoum HT, Korner P. A double-blind, randomized, saline-controlled study of the efficacy and safety of EUFLEXXA for treatment of painful osteoarthritis of the knee, with an open-label safety extension (the FLEXX Trial). Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2009;39(1):1-9. 4. Altman RD, Rosen JE, Bloch DA, Hatoum HT. Safety and efficacy of retreatment with a bioengineered hyaluronate for painful osteoarthritis of the knee: results of the open-label Extension Study of the FLEXX Trial. Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2011;19(10):1169-1175.

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